Lenten Sermon Series

Lent with Luke

The Bible and music go hand in hand in Anglican worship, especially at Evensong. The Dean, Frank Nelson, explores themes arising out of the Passion of Jesus according to Luke. Each sermon is followed by carefully chosen and poignant music sung by the Cathedral Choir and friends.

Lent 5: Wholeness in Holeyness: Luke 23: 26 - 49

Lent 5: 17 March

For his final sermon in the series the Dean looked at tonight’s reading which took us to the climax of the Passion narrative: the crucifixion and death of Jesus. Told in Luke’s detail-lacking style, it is a familiar story; one so familiar that it may be hard to hear it as if for the first time. Tonight we were invited to use our imagination as we sought out, and thought about, some of the people who were there. This is one of the techniques often taught in prayer schools. So tonight’s session was an invitation to pray, using the people who witnessed Jesus’ death as models of ourselves, bringing our own experiences in the Passion story.

The sermon was followed by a sensational performance of Handel's -"I know that my Redeemer liveth" performed by Emma Borgas, a member of the Adelaide Chamber Singers, and was accompanied by Organ Scholar Alana Brook.

To read th full text click Lent 5 sermon here or to listen to this sermon click here.

Lent 4: What evil has he done?

Lent 4: 10 March

Another hot evening in the Cathedral during which the Dean, in his penultimate sermon in this Lenten Series, again looked in depth at tonight's Gospel. His thoughtful insight into this reading is very evident as he used words beginning with the letter "C" to peel back the layers ("C" layers?) of that part of Luke's gospel where Jesus is accused, tried by Pontius Pilate, sent off to Herod, returned to Pilate and finally condemned to death.  Finally consideration was given to the 4 main players in the text during which the Dean invited us to consider with whom we most closely identified.

The sermon was followed by the St Peter's Cathedral Choir movingly singing that part of the Passion of Jesus according to Luke that we had been reflecting on this evening. The music was composed by Lodovico Grossi Viadana.

To read th full text click Lent 4 sermon here or to listen to his sermon click here.

Lent 3 - I do not know him!

Lent 3 : 3 March

Tonight the Dean reflected on Peter's denial.  While intimately taking us through Peter's denial, the Dean reflected on how easy it is for all of us to find ourselves in this situation, and the redemption of Peter. The Dean then moved on to the rest of the Gospel reading, examined the actions of the elders and guards and highlighted the similarities of their actions in our society today. 

At the end of the sermon the St Peter's Cathedral Choir performed a beautiful and moving rendition of the Reproaches singing John Sanders arrangement of the English text, with the repeated chorus: “Holy is God! Holy and strong! Holy immortal One, have mercy on us, have mercy on us.”

Read th full text of the Lent 3 sermon here.

Lent 2 - Pray that you may not come into the time of Trial!

Lent 2 : 24 February

 Pray that you may not come into the time of Trial!

Tonight the Dean follows on from last week as the story goes into the Garden of Gethsemane where Jesus comies into his Time of Trial, betrayal with a kiss, violent resistance by his disciples and his arrest. This is the hour of darkness. In our hour of darkness, how should we pray?

The sermon was followed immediately by the St Peter's Cathedral Choir led by the Music Director, Leonie Hempton, singing part of Allegri’s setting of Psalm 51, known as the ‘Miserere’. “Have mercy on me, O God, in your enduring goodness: according to the fruitfulness of your compassion blot out my offences.”

Read th full text of the Lent 2 sermon here.

Lent 1 - It is Enough -

Lent 1: 17 February

It is enough! Luke 22: 1 – 38

Music: Alleluyas of St James

This evening the Dean delivered his first sermon, "It is enough", in the series Lent with Luke.  A thought provoking sermon about the history of the Passover, the Last Supper, the link to our Eucharist through the ancient church, servant leadership and an invitation to think about what would we do if we took a place at the table of the Last Supper.

The sermon was followed immediately by the Trebles of St Peter's Cathedral Choir led by the Music Director, Leonie Hempton, singing  a beautiful and moving Alleluyas of St James - “Let all mortal flesh keep silence, and with fear and trembling stand.”

Read th full text of the Lent 1 sermon here. to find out why this music is so appropriate.

 

Posted on 17/03/2013 by
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